California legislature advances bill to require warning labels on gas stoves April 24, 2024

CALPIRG

During Tuesday’s Assembly Environmental Safety and Toxic Materials Committee, Stanford scientist Dr. Rob Jackson and neurologist Dr. Bret Andrews with Physicians for Social Responsibility testified in support of the gas stove labeling legislation. 

Dr. Bret Andrews added that these pollutants are associated with increased health risks, especially for children, noting that “exposure to increased levels of NO2 are associated with increased asthma, decreased lung development, chronic lung diseases, poor birth outcomes including low birth weight and premature births, decreased brain function and dementia, heart disease, stroke and premature death.” He shared that the concerns around gas stove pollution are shared by many health professionals, including sixty medical professionals that sent in a letter of support for the bill. 

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